Sugared Water 003

Available via WLH at Etsy. $10 each.

Each copy of #003 is wrapped lovingly in a hand-pulled, two color serigraph with stencil on 100% recycled (25% PCW), most 80# or 105# stock. This edition is limited to 100, each hand-numbered & handsewn. (Spring 2015)

Our cover features a skeletal lizard inspired by one of the pieces inside the mag. The drawing for this stencil is by Porkbelly Press’ own Jonathan Rountree.

Contributors for our third issue:
Valentina Cano, “Sea Bed Truths”
Sara Biggs Chaney, “How I Learned That I Was Poisonous”
Yuan Changming, “Solitude”
Tessa Cheek, “Grandmother”
Audrey Childress, “Between You and Death” & “Mourning Dove”
Dana Clark, “Remembrance”
Liz Dolan, “Holding Pattern” & “If the Bus is Late I Will Wait in the Rain”
Katherine Frain, “For Julia, Whom I No Longer Love” & “Say Honey”
Jennifer Gravley, “Daughter”
J. Todd Hawkins, “On the Glories of Graffiti” & “November Missing”
Russel Hehn, “Brittle Little Things”
Ann Hudson, “Crush”
Mark Jackley, “Country Dance” & “History and Geography”
Anna Leahy, “Nuclear Haiku”
Rachel Mangini, “A Test of Art and Science”
Sarah Nix, “Photograph”
Molly Prosser, “My Ex-Boyfriend’s Ex-Drummer Used to Live in Texas” & “Dawn”
Jim Redmond, “E Motherfucking T”
JoAnna Scandiffio, “Moonlighting at the Post Office”
Caitlin Scarano, “What Should Have Been Four” & “The Animal for the Year in Which You Left”
Melvin Shackelford, “Vital Mechanics of the Cold War, Ended”
Rhiannon Thorne, “The Ringer”
Maggie Woodward, “Field Guide to Farming in Winter”
Alicia Wright, “Some Wildness” & “Memorial Gardens”
Emily Yoon, “It’s Dark in Here” & “Your Poem About Another Woman” & “Grandmother Reminisces with Peaches”
Cover: Jonathan Rountree & Nicci Mechler

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Sweet Fiction: Q&A with Katie Berger

Today’s Q&A is with Katie Berger, a contributor of fiction to the second issue of Sugared Water.

Katie Berger grew up and lives in Nebraska. She recently graduated with her MFA from the University of Alabama.

a little taste of “Valentine’s Dayfrom SW#002:

In that same non-season my neighbor Adam banished his bed from his bedroom. A single scoot-creak across to the door, a question mark of dust, a bump on the wall that led to a corner-sized dent, and his bedroom fell under new governance. It was no longer an oligarchy of dreams and disenfranchised hands groping blindly about under the rule of sleep—the new space filled with nothing but a fuzzy sock and ideas. Adam began to fill the room with a work bench, a set of notebooks, a pile of pens, and a now-kinked Slinky I saw on television last month. Adam then announced he was building a robot.

SW: What are you currently reading?
KB: I just started The City and the City by China Mieville.

SW: What are you working on now?
KB: I recently finished my chapbook, Swans, a sequence of poems that used noir/detective conventions as scaffolding. Tentatively, my next project might involve a failed moon colony and/or pre-fabricated nostalgia, although I’ve not yet decided if it will be prose, poetry, or a mix of both.

SW: What writers/works have inspired you?
KB: Bruno Schulz and his idea of “autobiography of spirit,” or construction of a deeply personal mythology, has certainly influenced my work. Proust, too–he’s got such a heart-stopping way of mapping desire and memory. And because I work as a product copywriter, I have a gaping soft spot for 1980’s Sears Wish Books.

SW: Where do you seek inspiration?
KB: It’s strange–sometimes an image or scene will stick in my brain for months or years before I sit down to explore it in words and slowly build a reality around it. My inspiration is always those tiny little images, those whispers of phrases. From there, I add the scenery.

SW: Would you talk a bit about your writing process?
KB: Fits and starts–I’ll go several months without working on anything at all. But once I do, it’s slow and steady, about an hour a day every few days. Swans, which is about 20 pages, took about five months. I also like to tackle the same subject/world but rove amongst prose, prose poetry, verse, etc. That modulation really excites me.

SW: With what are you obsessed?
KB: College football, The Adventures of Pete and Pete, tea, visiting Seattle again, watching Jeopardy. Prose vs. verse. Star Wars vs. Trek.

 

Bibliography

Time Travel: Theory and Practice, Dancing Girl Press, 2013.

Katie Berger | SW#002

Sweet Fiction: Q&A with Carol Guess

Today’s Q&A is with Carol Guess, contributor of fiction (co-author Kelly Magee)  to the inaugural issue of Sugared Water. Their collaborative piece is titled “The Storm Grower.”

Carol Guess is the author of thirteen books of poetry and prose, including Darling Endangered and Doll Studies: Forensics. Forthcoming books include How to Feel Confident With Your Special Talents (poems co-written with Daniela Olszewska) and With Animal (stories co-written with Kelly Magee). She teaches at Western Washington University, and keeps a blog here: www.carolguess.blogspot.com.

a little taste of “The Storm Grower” from SW#001:

The garden is in the backyard. Hurricane, tornado, blizzard. Betty grows them in rows, strung up on the fence with twine. People come to her with their demands, and she gives them shoots and cuttings and bulbs: a hurricane eye in a Styrofoam cup. “Keep it moist,” she tells them, or, “Plenty of light.” They walk from her house carefully, down the front porch steps cradling weather. They use the storms for insurance claims, to get rid of unsightly properties, to deal with termite problems or annoying neighbors. “Watch the size on this one,” she says of a super cell in a glass dome. “Could get out of control.”

They come to her with needs and cash, and she sends them away with solutions.

One day a child rings the bell.

SW: What are you currently reading?
CG: I’m focused on legal cases and journalism aimed at freeing nonhuman animals from captivity.

SW: What are you working on now?
CG: I just started a new poetry collection about a woman in an eating disorder treatment center.

SW: What writers/works have inspired you?
CG: Too many to list! But current favorites include Allison Benis White, Shane McCrae, and Richard Siken.

SW: Where do you seek inspiration?
CG: Often from visual art, especially photography and painting.

SW: Would you talk a bit about your writing process?
CG: Writing gives me pleasure. It’s not a struggle; it’s the joy in my day. As a prolific writer, it’s important to me not to write the same book twice. I’m constantly seeking new subject matter, new forms, and new ways of collaborating with other artists. I like to feel challenged and pushed.

SW: With what are you obsessed?
CG: Nonhuman animals, including my four domestic companion animals and the wild birds living in the trees around my house. I’m also obsessed with seeking freedom for animals in inhumane captivity, and would love to find creative, artistic ways to contribute to this movement. Ideas welcome!

Carol Guess | blog | SW#001

Sweet Fiction: Q&A with Rebecca Emanuelsen

Today’s brief Q&A is with Rebecca Emanuelsen, a contributor of fiction to the inaugural issue of Sugared Water. Her story “Fred the Fish” was our first acceptance of fiction, and also inspired the goldfish cover for SW#001.

Rebecca Emanuelsen lives, works, and writes in Michigan. As much as she likes pointing out locations on her hand and calling soda “pop,” she dreams of moving to a place where the sidewalk will never be coated in an inch-thick layer of ice. Her stories have appeared in Shimmer, Parcel, Fractured West, and elsewhere.

a little taste of “Fred the Fish,” her short fiction:

Fred the fish likes bloodworms and all the flakes except the green ones. Hannah picks those ones out, then sprinkles in a handful of everything else. Her portly little goldfish bobs in the water, gulping down food particles until his stomach begins to swell, only relenting in his feeding frenzy when morsels begin to float back up out of his mouth like smokers’ exhalations. The remnants of his meal eventually drift down to settle on the bottom of the bowl, creating a light film like dirty snow. They blanket the neon pebbles and the small castle that Hannah purchased with spare change scraped up from under couch cushions and inside cup holders.

“Thanks, doll,” Fred says, patting his bulging belly with a fin.

“No problem,” Hannah replies as she pops a piece of bubblegum into her mouth. “But I’m a real girl, not a doll.”

SW: What are you currently reading?
RE: I’m currently reading about fourteen textbooks a week because I’m working as a proofreader over the summer.
I’m also reading Nelly Reifler’s short story collection, See Through.

SW: What are you working on now?
RE: Short stories with various magical elements as well as an urban fantasy novel.

SW: What writers/works have inspired you?
RE: Howl’s Moving Castle and Charmed Life by Diana Wynne Jones are two of my very favorite books. I really appreciate DWJ’s world-building abilities and her treatment of young characters. She was a fantastic writer.

SW: Where do you seek inspiration?
RE: On long walks and in conversations with my best friend, Nichole “Prite” Mercado, who has kindly drawn a number of my characters over the decade that we’ve known each other.

SW: Would you talk a bit about your writing process?
RE: I have a weird, spotty schedule when it comes to writing. Sometimes I don’t write for several weeks. Sometimes I crank out a 6,000-word story in two days. Either way, my process usually involves thinking about something for at least a week (often much longer) and then researching various elements for a few days before putting pen to paper (or fingers to keyboard). I’m generally not a “write every day” writer, and that’s fine because my current process works for me, though only for short stories. When I want to actually make progress on my novel, I have to commit to a more regular (preferably daily) schedule.

SW: With what are you obsessed?
RE: So many things. I go through periods of intense interest in various subjects. Chambered nautiluses, accordion music, and abandoned towns are three things I’ve been focusing on lately.

Rebecca Emanuelsen | blog | SW#001