Epistolary, limited edition anthology

Epistolary is a 60 page anthology in limited edition (125). The cover art is a collage of gouache, tissue, ink, and paper. The binding is sewn by hand with heavy thread. Cover is produced digitally on Epson Ultra Premium matte paper.| more info

Some of the snippets you’ll read are true, some invented, but all are intended for some kind of audience. It’s a little bit like sneaking a look inside someone’s journal, or wandering through a garden of secrets.

Contributors

Lori Brack, Marilyn Cavicchia, Emily Rose Cole, Kelly DuMar, Ruth Foley, Karen George, Mary Hammerbeck, Barbara Harroun, Joy KMT, Ross Losapio, Fayroze Lutta, Sarah McCartt-Jackson, Meredith McDonough, Lisa Megraw, P. Andrew Miller, Joe Nicholas, Julia Park Tracey (& Doris), Jonathan Travelstead, & Meg Tuite.

Anthologies

From time to time, Porkbelly Press and Sugared Water‘s staff team up to create an anthology of works related to a theme or cluster of images as source inspiration. We’re working in limited and small edition for our anthos, and often consider a range of work from lyric poetry to short essay and illustrated narrative. We collect the unusual, the odd, and those curiosities that ask you to pause, look, and linger a while. The covers are produced digitally or by serigraph.

Our Emily antho call is currently open, once again working with Porkbelly Press’ staff: Emily is a collection of poetry&prose inspired by the works, life, and letters of Emily Dickinson. The anthology is to be split into several sections, each loosely clustered around one of the major themes&image in her works. We’re looking for all kinds of work for this anthology, be it poetry, prose, creative nonfiction, artwork, doodles, notes, short critical essays, illustrated narratives, comics, or illustrations.

Sweet Poetry: Q&A with Malisa Garlieb

Today’s Q&A is with Malisa Garlieb, a contributor of poetry to the second issue of Sugared Water.

Malisa Garlieb is a Waldorf teacher living and working in Shelburne, Vermont. Her poems have appeared in Calyx, So to Speak, Off the Coast, Painted Bride Quarterly, and Lines + Stars, among other journals and anthologies.  Her first book, Handing Out Apples in Eden, is available from Sunridge Poetry.

a little taste of “Blueberry Seasonfrom SW#002:

If I get enough to cook and sugar
the jam can shine
on the crusts of winter, when light
and memory are shorter and more needed.
Last January our touch couldn’t
catch though my body cheated it
and ripened by routine.
I kept checking the pantry of our marriage.
Had enough been put away, is there enough to last?
Twelve lids sealed to glass, all the rims twisted tight.

SW: What are you currently reading?
MG: A lot!  In poetry I’m reading Stephen Cramer’s Tongue & Groove, Mary Szybist’s Incarnadine, and everything I can find by Karin Gottshall.  In fiction, it’s The Dovekeepers by Alice Hoffman.  Mary Cassatt: A Life by Nancy Mowll Mathews is at the top of the pile for non-fiction.

SW: What are you working on now?
MG: I’ve begun a suite of poems about Impressionist paintings owned by and exhibited at The Shelburne Musuem.  Mary Cassatt’s life, as well as her portraits, particularly intrique me.  She’s often thought of sentimentally for her mother and child paintings, but she was a modern feminist who painted women in all stages of their lives.  The psychological complexities of womanhood and femininity can be found in her works, and this is what I most hope to capture in poetry.

SW: What writers/works have inspired you?
MG: Jane Hirshfield and Jesse Lee Kercheval are two major influences.  Deborah Digges, Sandra Alcosser, Kim Addonizio, Li-Young Lee, Sharon Olds, Wendell Berry, and Ted Kooser are other favorites.  I could go on…

SW: Where do you seek inspiration?
MG: Other artists inspire me.  Relationships, as well.

SW: Would you talk a bit about your writing process?
MG: It comes in waves–some weeks I’m writing everyday, other times a month goes by without a word.  But I’m always on the lookout for a surprising image, a play on words, or musicality in a phrase.  I begin poems in my journal, switching to a screen only when I have something substantial, something strong enough for the transfer.

SW: With what are you obsessed?
MG: I’m currently obsessed with Norse mythology, green smoothies, and my eight-year-old son’s advancing vocabulary (he used the word “ostracized” today).

 

Bibliography

Handing Out Apples in Eden

 

Malisa Garlieb | SW#002

Sweet Fiction: Q&A with Katie Berger

Today’s Q&A is with Katie Berger, a contributor of fiction to the second issue of Sugared Water.

Katie Berger grew up and lives in Nebraska. She recently graduated with her MFA from the University of Alabama.

a little taste of “Valentine’s Dayfrom SW#002:

In that same non-season my neighbor Adam banished his bed from his bedroom. A single scoot-creak across to the door, a question mark of dust, a bump on the wall that led to a corner-sized dent, and his bedroom fell under new governance. It was no longer an oligarchy of dreams and disenfranchised hands groping blindly about under the rule of sleep—the new space filled with nothing but a fuzzy sock and ideas. Adam began to fill the room with a work bench, a set of notebooks, a pile of pens, and a now-kinked Slinky I saw on television last month. Adam then announced he was building a robot.

SW: What are you currently reading?
KB: I just started The City and the City by China Mieville.

SW: What are you working on now?
KB: I recently finished my chapbook, Swans, a sequence of poems that used noir/detective conventions as scaffolding. Tentatively, my next project might involve a failed moon colony and/or pre-fabricated nostalgia, although I’ve not yet decided if it will be prose, poetry, or a mix of both.

SW: What writers/works have inspired you?
KB: Bruno Schulz and his idea of “autobiography of spirit,” or construction of a deeply personal mythology, has certainly influenced my work. Proust, too–he’s got such a heart-stopping way of mapping desire and memory. And because I work as a product copywriter, I have a gaping soft spot for 1980’s Sears Wish Books.

SW: Where do you seek inspiration?
KB: It’s strange–sometimes an image or scene will stick in my brain for months or years before I sit down to explore it in words and slowly build a reality around it. My inspiration is always those tiny little images, those whispers of phrases. From there, I add the scenery.

SW: Would you talk a bit about your writing process?
KB: Fits and starts–I’ll go several months without working on anything at all. But once I do, it’s slow and steady, about an hour a day every few days. Swans, which is about 20 pages, took about five months. I also like to tackle the same subject/world but rove amongst prose, prose poetry, verse, etc. That modulation really excites me.

SW: With what are you obsessed?
KB: College football, The Adventures of Pete and Pete, tea, visiting Seattle again, watching Jeopardy. Prose vs. verse. Star Wars vs. Trek.

 

Bibliography

Time Travel: Theory and Practice, Dancing Girl Press, 2013.

Katie Berger | SW#002