Sugared Water 003

Available via WLH at Etsy. $10 each.

Each copy of #003 is wrapped lovingly in a hand-pulled, two color serigraph with stencil on 100% recycled (25% PCW), most 80# or 105# stock. This edition is limited to 100, each hand-numbered & handsewn. (Spring 2015)

Our cover features a skeletal lizard inspired by one of the pieces inside the mag. The drawing for this stencil is by Porkbelly Press’ own Jonathan Rountree.

Contributors for our third issue:
Valentina Cano, “Sea Bed Truths”
Sara Biggs Chaney, “How I Learned That I Was Poisonous”
Yuan Changming, “Solitude”
Tessa Cheek, “Grandmother”
Audrey Childress, “Between You and Death” & “Mourning Dove”
Dana Clark, “Remembrance”
Liz Dolan, “Holding Pattern” & “If the Bus is Late I Will Wait in the Rain”
Katherine Frain, “For Julia, Whom I No Longer Love” & “Say Honey”
Jennifer Gravley, “Daughter”
J. Todd Hawkins, “On the Glories of Graffiti” & “November Missing”
Russel Hehn, “Brittle Little Things”
Ann Hudson, “Crush”
Mark Jackley, “Country Dance” & “History and Geography”
Anna Leahy, “Nuclear Haiku”
Rachel Mangini, “A Test of Art and Science”
Sarah Nix, “Photograph”
Molly Prosser, “My Ex-Boyfriend’s Ex-Drummer Used to Live in Texas” & “Dawn”
Jim Redmond, “E Motherfucking T”
JoAnna Scandiffio, “Moonlighting at the Post Office”
Caitlin Scarano, “What Should Have Been Four” & “The Animal for the Year in Which You Left”
Melvin Shackelford, “Vital Mechanics of the Cold War, Ended”
Rhiannon Thorne, “The Ringer”
Maggie Woodward, “Field Guide to Farming in Winter”
Alicia Wright, “Some Wildness” & “Memorial Gardens”
Emily Yoon, “It’s Dark in Here” & “Your Poem About Another Woman” & “Grandmother Reminisces with Peaches”
Cover: Jonathan Rountree & Nicci Mechler

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issue #003 is a WIP, coming v. soon!

Sugared Water issue #003 is a work in progress on the proof table, and the cover’s in the works. Here’s a sneak peek of the first of two color passes going down on the screening table.

As usual, we’re working on 80# – 105# cover stock made from 100% recycled, minimum 20% PCW paper. This issue is an edition of 100 hand-numbered, handbound copies. We’ll post again when it’s proofed and the lineup is finalized!

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Emily!

Our Emily anthology contains poetry & art inspired by the life+works of American poet Emily Dickinson.

Emily is a 40 page anthology in limited edition (125). The binding is sewn by hand with heavy thread. | $8.50

Emily is a special edition outside of the regular submission period & subscription. We asked for works inspired by Emily Dickinson’s life and letters, suggesting only broad themes. We’re enamored of the smart, savvy poet, the woman who lowered cookies from her window for neighborhood children, baked bread for neighbors, and coconut cake for friends, penned over 1,700 poems, shared so much of herself in letters, and maintained intimate correspondence with her brother’s wife, Suzie, from across the hedge for all of those years.

Included in this edition you’ll find works inspired sweet Emilie and found poetry pulled from bits of her lines & letters.

Very affectionately yours,

Sugared Water & Porkbelly Press

Contributors

E. Kristin Anderson, Natasha Arora, Sarah Feldman, Laura Garrison, Karen George, Sonja Johanson, Sarah Nichols, Jeremy Pataky, Nicole Tong, Robin Turner, Loretta Diane Walker, Hilda Weaver, & Laura Madeline Wiseman.

Cover

Cover Art: Front: detail, “One Need Not Be a Chamber to Be Haunted” (monotype + mixed media on wood, 10¼ x 17 inches). Back: detail, “Open Me Carefully” (5 ¼ x 8 x 1½ inches, assemblage with found objects + mini spikes).

Cover artist: Nicci Mechler | damnredshoes.wordpress.com

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Epistolary, limited edition anthology

Epistolary is a 60 page anthology in limited edition (125). The cover art is a collage of gouache, tissue, ink, and paper. The binding is sewn by hand with heavy thread. Cover is produced digitally on Epson Ultra Premium matte paper.| more info

Some of the snippets you’ll read are true, some invented, but all are intended for some kind of audience. It’s a little bit like sneaking a look inside someone’s journal, or wandering through a garden of secrets.

Contributors

Lori Brack, Marilyn Cavicchia, Emily Rose Cole, Kelly DuMar, Ruth Foley, Karen George, Mary Hammerbeck, Barbara Harroun, Joy KMT, Ross Losapio, Fayroze Lutta, Sarah McCartt-Jackson, Meredith McDonough, Lisa Megraw, P. Andrew Miller, Joe Nicholas, Julia Park Tracey (& Doris), Jonathan Travelstead, & Meg Tuite.

Anthologies

From time to time, Porkbelly Press and Sugared Water‘s staff team up to create an anthology of works related to a theme or cluster of images as source inspiration. We’re working in limited and small edition for our anthos, and often consider a range of work from lyric poetry to short essay and illustrated narrative. We collect the unusual, the odd, and those curiosities that ask you to pause, look, and linger a while. The covers are produced digitally or by serigraph.

Our Emily antho call is currently open, once again working with Porkbelly Press’ staff: Emily is a collection of poetry&prose inspired by the works, life, and letters of Emily Dickinson. The anthology is to be split into several sections, each loosely clustered around one of the major themes&image in her works. We’re looking for all kinds of work for this anthology, be it poetry, prose, creative nonfiction, artwork, doodles, notes, short critical essays, illustrated narratives, comics, or illustrations.

Sweet Poetry: Q&A with Malisa Garlieb

Today’s Q&A is with Malisa Garlieb, a contributor of poetry to the second issue of Sugared Water.

Malisa Garlieb is a Waldorf teacher living and working in Shelburne, Vermont. Her poems have appeared in Calyx, So to Speak, Off the Coast, Painted Bride Quarterly, and Lines + Stars, among other journals and anthologies.  Her first book, Handing Out Apples in Eden, is available from Sunridge Poetry.

a little taste of “Blueberry Seasonfrom SW#002:

If I get enough to cook and sugar
the jam can shine
on the crusts of winter, when light
and memory are shorter and more needed.
Last January our touch couldn’t
catch though my body cheated it
and ripened by routine.
I kept checking the pantry of our marriage.
Had enough been put away, is there enough to last?
Twelve lids sealed to glass, all the rims twisted tight.

SW: What are you currently reading?
MG: A lot!  In poetry I’m reading Stephen Cramer’s Tongue & Groove, Mary Szybist’s Incarnadine, and everything I can find by Karin Gottshall.  In fiction, it’s The Dovekeepers by Alice Hoffman.  Mary Cassatt: A Life by Nancy Mowll Mathews is at the top of the pile for non-fiction.

SW: What are you working on now?
MG: I’ve begun a suite of poems about Impressionist paintings owned by and exhibited at The Shelburne Musuem.  Mary Cassatt’s life, as well as her portraits, particularly intrique me.  She’s often thought of sentimentally for her mother and child paintings, but she was a modern feminist who painted women in all stages of their lives.  The psychological complexities of womanhood and femininity can be found in her works, and this is what I most hope to capture in poetry.

SW: What writers/works have inspired you?
MG: Jane Hirshfield and Jesse Lee Kercheval are two major influences.  Deborah Digges, Sandra Alcosser, Kim Addonizio, Li-Young Lee, Sharon Olds, Wendell Berry, and Ted Kooser are other favorites.  I could go on…

SW: Where do you seek inspiration?
MG: Other artists inspire me.  Relationships, as well.

SW: Would you talk a bit about your writing process?
MG: It comes in waves–some weeks I’m writing everyday, other times a month goes by without a word.  But I’m always on the lookout for a surprising image, a play on words, or musicality in a phrase.  I begin poems in my journal, switching to a screen only when I have something substantial, something strong enough for the transfer.

SW: With what are you obsessed?
MG: I’m currently obsessed with Norse mythology, green smoothies, and my eight-year-old son’s advancing vocabulary (he used the word “ostracized” today).

 

Bibliography

Handing Out Apples in Eden

 

Malisa Garlieb | SW#002

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Sweet Fiction: Q&A with Katie Berger

Today’s Q&A is with Katie Berger, a contributor of fiction to the second issue of Sugared Water.

Katie Berger grew up and lives in Nebraska. She recently graduated with her MFA from the University of Alabama.

a little taste of “Valentine’s Dayfrom SW#002:

In that same non-season my neighbor Adam banished his bed from his bedroom. A single scoot-creak across to the door, a question mark of dust, a bump on the wall that led to a corner-sized dent, and his bedroom fell under new governance. It was no longer an oligarchy of dreams and disenfranchised hands groping blindly about under the rule of sleep—the new space filled with nothing but a fuzzy sock and ideas. Adam began to fill the room with a work bench, a set of notebooks, a pile of pens, and a now-kinked Slinky I saw on television last month. Adam then announced he was building a robot.

SW: What are you currently reading?
KB: I just started The City and the City by China Mieville.

SW: What are you working on now?
KB: I recently finished my chapbook, Swans, a sequence of poems that used noir/detective conventions as scaffolding. Tentatively, my next project might involve a failed moon colony and/or pre-fabricated nostalgia, although I’ve not yet decided if it will be prose, poetry, or a mix of both.

SW: What writers/works have inspired you?
KB: Bruno Schulz and his idea of “autobiography of spirit,” or construction of a deeply personal mythology, has certainly influenced my work. Proust, too–he’s got such a heart-stopping way of mapping desire and memory. And because I work as a product copywriter, I have a gaping soft spot for 1980’s Sears Wish Books.

SW: Where do you seek inspiration?
KB: It’s strange–sometimes an image or scene will stick in my brain for months or years before I sit down to explore it in words and slowly build a reality around it. My inspiration is always those tiny little images, those whispers of phrases. From there, I add the scenery.

SW: Would you talk a bit about your writing process?
KB: Fits and starts–I’ll go several months without working on anything at all. But once I do, it’s slow and steady, about an hour a day every few days. Swans, which is about 20 pages, took about five months. I also like to tackle the same subject/world but rove amongst prose, prose poetry, verse, etc. That modulation really excites me.

SW: With what are you obsessed?
KB: College football, The Adventures of Pete and Pete, tea, visiting Seattle again, watching Jeopardy. Prose vs. verse. Star Wars vs. Trek.

 

Bibliography

Time Travel: Theory and Practice, Dancing Girl Press, 2013.

Katie Berger | SW#002

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Pushcart Prize Nominations

We’re pleased to say that we’re nominating for the Pushcart Prize starting this year. Each year, mags/presses are allowed to nominate 6 works. Two issues fall within the calendar year (SW #002 and the forthcoming Epistolary), so we’ve chosen a few from each. Our envelope of nominations is on its way to be added to the list, and we look forward to the press’ decision. Winners, as chosen by Pushcart, will printed in the Best of the Small Presses anthology.

Our 6 nominations are as follows:

Creative Nonfiction

“Mulberries” by Dustin Parsons, from SW#002.
“A Letter of Love and Betrayal” by Meg Tuite, from Epistolary.

Poetry

“Everything Afterwards Had Been” by Anna King, from SW#002.
“Letter to Virginia” by Lori Brack, from Epistolary.
“Retired Freedom Fighter Responds to Her Lover’s Marriage Proposal” by Emily Rose Cole, from Epistolary.
“Dearest Eli” by Sarah McCartt-Jackson, from Epistolary.

In honor of the PP noms, we’ve decided to tweet 140 (or fewer) characters from each of the contributors in SW#002. From now to 14 December, you’ll find little snippets of poetry & prose in our sweet little feed.

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Sweet Poetry: Q&A with Anna King Ivey

Today’s Q&A is with Anna King Ivey, a contributor of poetry to the second issue of Sugared Water.

Anna Ivey is working on a PhD in poetry at Georgia State University in Atlanta, Georgia. Her most recent publications have been featured in Antithesis, Stone Highway Review, West Trade, and White Stag literary magazines. She lives in McDonough, Georgia with her husband Chad and her daughter Aralyn. Anna and Chad make soy candles for fun and attempt to sell them.

a little taste of “Everything Afterwards Had Beenfrom SW#002:

After the girl becomes an inspector she learns the whereabouts of symptoms painted with lightning. After the girl becomes an inspector she jettisons the cobblestones lodged in her grief. After the girl becomes an inspector she finally sees that no diagnosis is without new respective parameters of love…

SW: What are you currently reading?
AI: I am working on Fearless by Eric Blehm–it’s the story of Navy SEAL Adam Brown. I don’t usually read a lot of non-fiction, but a family member recommended the work after the piece became inspirational to him during recovery from drug addiction. Right before that I read Cane River by Lalita Tademy, which I loved.

SW: What are you working on now?
AI: I am toying with my third manuscript. I’m about halfway finished with it, but have been focusing more so on trying to publish my finished pieces instead of producing new material. My first manuscript is still looking for a publishing home which I know is out there somewhere.

SW: What writers/works have inspired you?
AI: Sylvia Plath is my favorite, as is the little-known Greek poet George Seferis. I also really enjoy Wallace Stevens. The fiction works that have really moved me are Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand, even though it’s very controversial in the academic community. I love Mythology by Edith Hamilton, The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, and To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee.

SW: Where do you seek inspiration?
AI: I am very moved by travel, though I don’t get to do so as often as I like. Usually having some quiet gives me the peace to begin processing all that I observe and what moves me from those observations. For a long time I wrote about my own grief of losing people I loved, but now instead of writing about what is past, I write about where I am in the present and all of the horrid, lovely accessories that come with it.

SW: Would you talk a bit about your writing process?
AI: I usually start with a word or a phrase in mind, usually something that is visual. Sometimes unusual words, or words I like, will be enough to begin a poem. I have become a predominately prose poet, so I have to find a balance between poetic language that bends towards the surreal and the imaginary and still ground it enough to be in some kind of reality. I’ve grown a lot since entering my PhD program at Georgia State University and thank everyone who has gone through workshop with me and had to say, “Uh, I have no idea what this means?”

SW: With what are you obsessed?
AI: Right now, it’s trying to publish my book! I’m also really working on incorporating the idea of Lord of the Rings, Third Eye Blind, Garth Brooks, and being a newly-wed into my newest project. Oh, and Crossfit! I am an avid Crossfit gymgoer, and I’m completely obsessed with my local gym, Crossfit Pulse.

Anna King Ivey | SW#002

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Sweet Creative Nonfiction: Q&A with Dustin Parsons

Today’s Q&A is with Dustin Parsons, a contributor of creative nonfiction to issue #002 of Sugared Water.

Dustin Parsons has work appearing recently in New Delta Review, DIAGRAM, The Collagist, Indiana Review, The Laurel Review, Sugared Water, and Seneca Review. He lives in Western New York with his wife and two sons.

a little taste of “Transmissionfrom SW#002:

We decide that the best way is to drop the transmission onto my dad’s chest and let him hold it there while I replace the seal. We could have found some padding, I suppose, an old mattress or the seat to a ’56 Willys sitting in his shop, but this seems faster and, besides, we’ll have a man who has his ass behind the weight when it’s time to put the transmission back. He lowers it as slowly as he can, but it plants itself on his sternum like a funnel cloud kissing ground.

SW: What are you currently reading?
DP: Mathew Gavin Frank’s Preparing the Ghost, a beautiful lyric book-length essay about his search for information regarding the man who took the first photo of a giant squid. Run, don’t walk to this book. I also just finished Hum by Jamaal May which was fantastic.

SW: What are you working on now?
DP: I’ve been researching the 80s oil boom and the early 90s movement by several southwest Kansas counties to secede from the rest of the state. This was happening just as I was graduating from high school and contemplating my own exodus from the state.

SW: What writers/works have inspired you?
DP: Theresa Cha’s Dictee is a real inspiration for my own work, as is William H. Gass’s Omensetter’s Luck. They are both books I read nearly every year.

SW: Where do you seek inspiration?
DP: I look to my own experiences, but often the best inspiration comes from my own research on the more obscure elements of a memory I’m working through on the page. My essay on the mulberry tree that appeared in this magazine was profoundly affected by the bit of information I found that said the pollen of a mulberry tree is released at half the speed of sound. First, it sounded so cool, and it ended up not only being the first line, but also dictated the breathless, fast form of the essay. There is no substitute for research–it is the information you don’t know about an experience that holds most of the power in an essay. Imagine how excited you were when you found out something you didn’t know–that excitement translates to the reader.

SW: Would you talk a bit about your writing process?
DP: With kids, the writing process is a bit more fast and loose than it used to be. An hour or two after the boys go down to bed. Twenty minutes reading through a paragraph when they are eating lunch. I write at a desk only once in every three sessions. I wrote my most recent essay in the waiting room of the Honda dealership getting my car’s oil changed. I’m back to pen and paper for the first time since I was in grad school. There are so many drafts I don’t bother counting. Each one shifts one small degree, but you put enough of them together and suddenly the essay isn’t what you thought it would be any more. I love seeing the first draft in my notebook, and comparing it to the final draft.

SW: With what are you obsessed?
DP: Right now, the way images and text work together to create meaning. I finished Joe Sacco’s Palestine recently, and was totally sold on the graphic essay. I’ve been looking through public domain images of schematics, diagrams, and “exploded view” catalogues of machinery, and adding essays to them. The exchange is fascinating, even when it doesn’t work.

Dustin Parsons | blog | SW#002

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Sweet Poetry: Q&A with Jessica Bixel

Today’s Q&A is with Jessica Bixel, a contributor of poetry to issues #001 & #002 of Sugared Water.

Jessica Bixel edits Rufous City Review with some of her favorite pals. Her recent work has appeared or is forthcoming in Birdfeast, Parcel, Houseguest Magazine, Lines + Stars, District Lit, Handsome, Sink Review, Leveler, and Transom Journal.

a little taste of “The Sister and Other Inventionsfrom SW#002:

I am calling myself magpie, lilac,
moon in a ravine before a river.
Lighthouse. I do this for you,
of course.

SW: What are you working on now?
JB: A silly novel. A series of poems about fire and loss and mothers. Letter writing.

SW: What writers have inspired you?
JB: Larissa Szporluk and Jennifer Chang, both stunning poets and stunning humans alike. Joshua Poteat. Brigit Pegeen Kelly. Allison Titus.

SW: Would you talk a bit about your writing process?
JB: I read somewhere the following: I’m very tolerant of stillness. I’d rather not move my hands just to move them. I’ll wait for the right thing. I hope I’m not misquoting. But I’ve come to tolerate spending more time not writing than writing. My process starts with a long stretch of silence, of listening, of (sometimes frustrating) stillness. But the wait, when I find the right thing, is worth it.

Jessica Bixel | web | SW#001 | SW#002

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